!-- Beacon Ads Ad Code -->

Sponsor Ad:

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why Should We Fear Introducing New Music?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Why Should We Fear Introducing New Music?

    Hi all...

    I have written a new blog post as to unleashing the power of new media to be able to foster greater congregational participation. It is written from a Catholic perspective, but I suspect the themes listed here are universal. Let me know what you think.

    ----

    Something that has been nagging my mind as of late.

    If you are a music minister, church organist, choir director or worship leader… how often do you blog?

    And by blogging, I mean, how often do you use that platform as an opportunity to introduce new songs? Or, if inclined, reintroduce some of the classic, forgotten hymns in your repertoire? Or, introduce a new melody based on the psalms for the upcoming week?

    And then, after you blog, how often do you ensure that your blog would be written up in your parish bulletin?

    Perhaps you don’t see the necessity of blogging–and that’s cool. But then you are also constantly limiting your song selection each week, with only those songs that you are absolutely certain the congregation knows. The problem being, a great number of these songs have become tired or dated, simply from overuse of singing.

    We live in extraordinary times. We can teach a song to the congregation before the congregation meets... MORE
    Nick Alexander
    Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
    Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
    Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

  • #2
    Good article Niclk. I agree somewhat to this but my concern would be with the technology aspect of it.

    I do think some churches fear new songs or how to approach implementing them. I currently live in a small town environment where a limitied amount of the congregation is very technically savvy. Saying "login into Facebook" or "it's on my SoundCloud" to some members would get you the deer in headlights look because they just aren't connected with their lives that way.

    I moved here from California so it was a total change of mindset for me coming from a hi-tech atmosphere to the exact opposite. I think knowing the congregation's strengths and using that to open the door to try new things is a more approachable avenue why I live. I would like more than anything to just post a clip or lyrics and the congregation know how to utilize that but in reality not everyone is able.

    I really like how you bring in the congregation before hand to teach a song.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you for your comments. One clarification, however.

      I am aware that people have different levels of aptitude when it comes to working with the Internet. As a person who is a programmer as his day job, I get that I need to make things as "dummy-proof" as I can.

      The level of complexity is on the part of the worship leader--not the congregant.

      All the congregant needs to know is one address: [www.calisurferworship.blogspot.com]. That is it.

      Everything else I mentioned... soundcloud, YouTube, etc., these are to be embedded in the blog posts within this site. They won't even need to leave your site--it's all there in blog posts, sorted by date, newest first.

      If this is done on a consistent basis, this will become a "thing," a new way for the congregant and the worship leader to interact, learning the song in advance, sharing opinions of it, sharing concerns, and being available. It will be another way you could reach out to your group.

      The tricky part is getting the embedded text onto your blog posts, but even this is easier now than ever, as the aforementioned sites have embedded text ready to copy/paste into your HTML code.

      Hope this helps. Again, thanks for your input!
      Nick Alexander
      Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
      Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
      Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

      Comment


      • #4
        There's a big difference between using the technology to share information, and getting the target audience to access that information. I would suspect that even though most churches have web sites, only a handful of congregants probably access it on any kind of regular basis. Web pages, blogs, music and video files all depend on the actions of a user, but the trick is in finding ways to market those links to the users in a way that they can easily access it. That's why paid search and SEM (Search Engine Marketing) are such a big part of today's internet business market.

        I think there are some fairly reasonable approaches one can use such as email lists with embedded links or Facebook. I've used Facebook with a certain amount of success in posting links to music on our Soundclick page, but it's still a relatively small percentage of the congregants that will see it and actually click on the link. The good thing about Facebook is the community is already fairly well established in Friend networks, and there is a likelihood that the link with get shared and further distributed, but it's still a mixed bag of results.

        I think possibly the best mechanism may ultimately be in mobile marketing through messages. With most people now using smartphones it's a readily accessible way of reaching people regardless of where they are. And all you really need is a phone number. I'm currently exploring ways I can use this as well as the other avenues to target accessing info on our churches cloud storage.

        If we really want these type of efforts to be successful we really should share our ideas of how to "outreach" with the technology to get better reach into our congregation. That's going to ultimately be the challenge.
        The Posse Band live performance tracks can be heard by CLICKING HERE

        Comment


        • #5
          This is most definitely an old-dog/new-trick issue. And yet, we are living at a time of relentless technological shifts, where entire industries are being clobbered because of the rise of new forms. Who in their right mind would have predicted that the time was short for Circuit City, Tower Records, Blockbuster Video, Borders Bookstore, etc.? When these venues went bankrupt, patrons had to learn the technology that had driven them out of business. And streaming, digital media, kindle books, etc., are becoming more commonplace each passing year.

          But it requires a brand new mindset, both of the patrons (congregation), and of the content-providers (pastors/worship leaders). I suspect that each passing year, the number of people being uncomfortable with blogs, new technology, podcasts, YouTube, etc., will decrease substantially. Think of all the pictures of cats they will miss out on!

          One excellent book on this, btw, is "The Hidden Power of Electronic Culture" by Shane Hipps, written a few years ago. He makes the point that for every technological advancement, a previously outdated issue would become current again. Case in point: when the music industry began in the 40s and 50s, it was comprised solely of singles. When time progressed, albums began to dominate as the preferred form. But when iTunes/digital downloading became the norm, we are all reverting back to singles.

          I am looking at this from a worship leaders' perspective. And I am in the (admittedly minority viewpoint) that old hymns will make a giant comeback. Nothing whatsoever against the current crop of U2-inspired praise and worship. It's just that, as artists begin to find ways to take their music to YouTube and podcasts, they will discover their limitations are in copyright law. And they will discern how to appropriate old forms to new sounds, copyright free. Plus, the added benefit of solid theology and poetry that they would not be able to top if they tried. We aren't there yet, but I can see it happening.
          Nick Alexander
          Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
          Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
          Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

          Comment


          • #6
            We can do more than one thing-

            For example, look at the customer support industry- companies use more than one medium for people to use. There is phone, e-mail, chat, and website, for starters. The most successful ones use several different forms to get the help they need.

            While blogs and social media are good, maybe the church bulletin or something else can be useful as well.

            I agree that there will be a shift to technology-based communications. Many churches have already started to phase out the bulletin much like the hymnal has been phased out.

            And I am in the (admittedly minority viewpoint) that old hymns will make a giant comeback.
            For awhile, about 10 years ago, there was this movement of 'new' hymns that never really gained traction. It was right when the 'pop praise' of Tomlin, Redman, et al was exploding. I agree there will be a shift away from what's currently happening to some sort of hymn style. It may be new or old hymns, but I can see it happening.

            I've linked to some articles a few months ago where young Christians are growing increasingly weary of the dog & pony show that the 'seeker friendly' churches have been pushing. There is trend data showing the more traditional churches are seeing an influx of younger people because they are looking for deeper theology and meaningful worship.
            If we want to go places we haven't been, we will have to do things we haven't done.

            Comment

            Working...
            X