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Any Other Reformed Guys on TWC???

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  • Any Other Reformed Guys on TWC???

    For all those that know me on worshiptrench, i am probably one of the few Reformed guys on this forum. Maybe not. I love it because sometimes I feel a bit fish out of water here but it challenges me.

    I am a Pauline doctrine of electionist and kind of neo-reformed. I am not a cessationist on the gifts but I believe they have specific usages, etc.

    Any other reformed guys on here????

  • #2
    I am as well.

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    • #3
      I'm lined up with Dr. C. Peter Wagner and all those guys. (Chuck Pierce, Dutch Sheets. Barbara Wentroble is the apostle directly over my pastors) We are apostolic reformation.

      Jeff

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      • #4
        Semper Reformanda

        I am a minister in a Presbyterian (PCA) church and graduated from Reformed Theological Seminary - Orlando.

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        • #5
          I'm part of the Dutch Reformed tradition.

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          • #6
            Our ministry is reformed!

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            • #7
              Well, with several Reformed folks here, I guess I will pose the question:

              How does Reformation theology affect your corporate worship services, when compared with what appears most common here on TWC and in evangelicalism at large?

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              • #8
                I think that the apostolic reformation movement I'm associated with is based in pentacostal beliefs, tongues, dancing, healing, the whole nine yards so worship is a major part of it and our church's style, really my style since I helped start the church and I've been over the music or heavily involved since day one, is more hard contemporary. R & B, urban gospel, rock flavor. I like not having a board decide music styles, equipment issues, etc. Our elder board meets once every couple of months and their all on board with everything we're wanting to do.

                Don't know if that answers your question. Just my $.02.


                Jeff

                Desiny Ministries
                LionsGate Music School

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                • #9
                  I know for us there are certain songs I pass on for theological reasons. There is a heavy emphasis on Scripture. Sola Scriptura.

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                  • #10
                    I'm a charismatic Calvinist. There are few Reformed-minded people in our fellowship. I'll leave it at that.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by windbag View Post
                      I'm a charismatic Calvinist. There are few Reformed-minded people in our fellowship. I'll leave it at that.
                      Do you end up fighting a lot of battles with people because you have theological reasons not to do things that they want to do?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by psalmsandhymns View Post
                        Do you end up fighting a lot of battles with people because you have theological reasons not to do things that they want to do?
                        I'm not sure I follow you on that.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by windbag View Post
                          I'm not sure I follow you on that.
                          Sorry. After rereading that post, it was pretty cryptic.

                          My question is this: As a leader who has come to a more Reformed understanding of Scripture, is there tension in the congregation when they don't share your underlying theology? Are they upset because you don't sing some songs which you believe to be lacking in Biblical doctrine? Or when you won't do things like sing patriotic songs?
                          Last edited by psalmsandhymns; 11-20-2008, 01:09 PM. Reason: Added question

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                          • #14
                            I've boycotted songs that are theologically wrong...not just questionable, because there is room for interpretation, but stuff that's outright wrong. I don't do the patriotic thing, evidenced by my assertion that the American Revolution was wrong (in another thread).

                            Once, before I was leading, I declined to play a certain song. The pastor/worship leader and I talked about it. He desperately wanted to play it and fit the Bible to match the song's theology. Eventually, we changed one word, and it worked. The congregation and worship team had to adjust slightly, but we've reworded stuff before, so it wasn't a big deal.

                            He has vetoed things that I don't think were definitively wrong. Mutual respect allows us freedom to do or not do things in accordance with our consciences and what we believe the Holy Spirit is leading us to do. Freedom and responsibility meet when we encounter something like that.

                            The tension from theological differences within the congregation don't spill over into the worship time, meaning the musical portion of our services (we call them celebrations). We sing praises to God that we can all add our hearty "Amen" to. I write and sing stuff that isn't for public consumption. Not every song has to be sung in a corporate setting. There are enough quality songs out there that stick to the basics.

                            There were hymns that sparked controversy, it isn't just contemporary P&W music. "I Surrender All" has the line "let Thy blessing fall on me." People didn't like the charismatic overtones, since it suggested that a separate outpouring of the Holy Spirit was available. Many hymnals change that line to read "let Thy blessings fall on me." The plural points away from baptism of the Holy Spirit.

                            Charles Wesley's "And Can It Be That I Should Gain" has the line "emptied Himself of all but love." Critics say that that line means that Jesus ceased to be God, since He emptied Himself of all, including His deity. Maybe Wesley simply meant that Jesus had no agenda other than expressing the Father's love to humanity?

                            When I was young, my Reformed views were argument starters. I'm not much interested in theological arguments anymore. If I were, then it would probably cause more of the tensions that you're wondering about.

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                            • #15
                              Speaking of interactions between Calvinists and Arminians, I'm reminded of a quote I heard in a Piper message about Charles Simeon in which Simeon met John Wesley.

                              Sir, I understand that you are called an Arminian; and I have been sometimes called a Calvinist; and therefore I suppose we are to draw daggers. But before I consent to begin the combat, with your permission I will ask you a few questions. Pray, Sir, do you feel yourself a depraved creature, so depraved that you would never have thought of turning to God, if God had not first put it into your heart?

                              Yes, I do indeed.

                              And do you utterly despair of recommending yourself to God by anything you can do; and look for salvation solely through the blood and righteousness of Christ?

                              Yes, solely through Christ.

                              But, Sir, supposing you were at first saved by Christ, are you not somehow or other to save yourself afterwards by your own works?

                              No, I must be saved by Christ from first to last.

                              Allowing, then, that you were first turned by the grace of God, are you not in some way or other to keep yourself by your own power?

                              No.

                              What then, are you to be upheld every hour and every moment by God, as much as an infant in its mother's arms?

                              Yes, altogether.

                              And is all your hope in the grace and mercy of God to preserve you unto His heavenly kingdom?

                              Yes, I have no hope but in Him.

                              Then, Sir, with your leave I will put up my dagger again; for this is all my Calvinism; this is my election, my justification by faith, my final perseverance: it is in substance all that I hold, and as I hold it; and therefore, if you please, instead of searching out terms and phrases to be a ground of contention between us, we will cordially unite in those things wherein we agree.

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