!-- Beacon Ads Ad Code -->

Sponsor Ad:

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Good amp[s] for worship?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    gregrjones, it's not that your amp is to loud it's more than likely a bad room. The solution i've found is facing your amp towards you and having sound absorption panels on the walls behind you to catch the sound waves and not reflect them. One of my best friends is a sound man at a church and he did that. Not only did it reduce stage volume it made mixing and eq'n easier because the mics were not catching so much mud.

    On topic i now play a Mark V thru a 1x12 cab in 10w mode, people love it, it's never to loud and all i need is a little delay and reverb for fun.
    Live Blessed!

    Comment


    • #62
      I love my Fenders, blues deluxe and a hot rod. Of course they where way to loud couldn't go pass 2 so I replaced the the pre amp tubes with lesser value ones ( going from ax7s to ay's ) and problem solved. They take pedals very well and fx loop a plus. Wanna a little ac 30 on some songs but not all the time, a treble booster and your there and with the tube change now your od channel is a volume boost.

      Comment


      • #63
        I am finding that I'm getting my best tones with an amp set clean and using external overdrive pedals. Right now, I'm getting my best tone with a Blackstar HT-60 or HT-5 (when I don't need as much horse power) set squeaky clean.

        For some reason, even though these amps have great gain channels, they don't sound as good to me as the clean channel with an OD in front of it.

        For OD, my favorite is a Fulltone Mosfet 2, however I also use the modeled ODs inside of my Zoom G3. The Zoom is ideal for a very portable rig.

        Comment


        • #64
          So I'm assuming the OP has already bought an amp and by now, possibly already has moved onto another amp, but to anyone who likes the sound of the normal channel of an AC30 (which is great for worship) and their budget would allow them to get a hand wired AC30, I would pick up a used Morgan instead. Best gear choice I've ever made.

          Comment


          • #65
            I surprised a bit by the lack of modeling amps being used here. Maybe it's just our style of worship music, but it's pretty diverse. I use a Line 6 Spider 75 and typically use about 9 or 10 different amp presets to cover all of our material. I try very hard to align my sound with the style of song we're playing, and I can't imagine doing that with a non-modeling amp. I'm not a big fan of a song by Blind Boys of Alabama sounding like a Darrell Mansfield song.
            The Posse Band live performance tracks can be heard by CLICKING HERE

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by nomad100 View Post
              gregrjones, it's not that your amp is to loud it's more than likely a bad room. The solution i've found is facing your amp towards you and having sound absorption panels on the walls behind you to catch the sound waves and not reflect them. One of my best friends is a sound man at a church and he did that. Not only did it reduce stage volume it made mixing and eq'n easier because the mics were not catching so much mud.

              On topic i now play a Mark V thru a 1x12 cab in 10w mode, people love it, it's never to loud and all i need is a little delay and reverb for fun.
              I don't know. I got the privilege of playing a stadium for a church's Easter service a few years ago. I thought that surely I'd get to crank my amp. It is a 60 watt Blackstar combo. It was sitting underneath the stage and pointed away from the audience. However, even in THAT context, I was told that it was too loud!

              BTW, I always turn my amp away from the congregation, unless dealing with a really bad PA.

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by DunedinDragon View Post
                I surprised a bit by the lack of modeling amps being used here. Maybe it's just our style of worship music, but it's pretty diverse. I use a Line 6 Spider 75 and typically use about 9 or 10 different amp presets to cover all of our material. I try very hard to align my sound with the style of song we're playing, and I can't imagine doing that with a non-modeling amp. I'm not a big fan of a song by Blind Boys of Alabama sounding like a Darrell Mansfield song.
                The approach you describe is valid and I always advocate that a guitarist play and use tones that are suitable for the style. But in my mind, that doesn't necessarily mean that one has to clone the original tones.

                You mentioned Darrel Mansfield. For his bluesy material, I always thought that SRV's Texas sized tones would have been better for his songs than that 80's shred tone he used. If my worship band were to do a Mansfield tone, and the guitarist wanted to use a Texas blues tone, I'm all for it.

                Another approach to consider is to use a smaller subset of tones in order to create coherence. I currently use a Pod HD500 for leading worship with a modified Lincoln Brewster patch (I use less delay and distortion than the patch that I originally downloaded). I play an Eric Johnson Strat with it most often.

                For most any song that needs distortion, I use the modified Brewster patch. Exceptions will be if a song has heavy power chords like Manifesto. For that tune, I DO use a high gain patch with my John Petrucci signature guitar.

                There are pros and cons of both approaches. I think the approach you describe brings more diversity but may do that at the risk of giving the listener tonal 'whiplash'. The alternative, gives more coherence but risks things being too monolithic.

                I favor risking being too monolithic with the latter approach only because it has the potential to give our worship team more 'ownership' over the tune. In my mind, making the song sound exactly like the original studio recording is not as interesting as adding your own unique identity while preserving the essence of the song.

                My best guitar tones come from my analog rig, not my modeler. I get a tone out of the clean channel of my Blackstar HT-60 soloist using a Fulltone Mosfet 2 OD pedal, Eventide Timefactor delay and Xotic EP Booster that is a neat mix between Eric Johnson, SRV and Carlos Santana. Unless it is totally inappropriate, my application of 'my tone' generated from this rig, allows me to put my own signature on the music without be unfaithful to the style of the music.

                What I'm more zealous against, is using sounds that totally don't fit the style. Examples would be playing high gain 80's tones with liberal use of chorus and reverb on God of Wonders. Another would be to use 70's psychedlic Pink Floyd flanger and phaser tones for your average Hillsong tune. Generally, these approaches won't fit the music.
                Last edited by gregrjones; 06-07-2013, 08:06 AM.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by davoandles View Post
                  I love my Fenders, blues deluxe and a hot rod. Of course they where way to loud couldn't go pass 2 so I replaced the the pre amp tubes with lesser value ones ( going from ax7s to ay's ) and problem solved. They take pedals very well and fx loop a plus. Wanna a little ac 30 on some songs but not all the time, a treble booster and your there and with the tube change now your od channel is a volume boost.
                  Yeah, that's been my one beef against Fenders. Most of them are too loud for me. I haven't messed around enough with the Blues Jr. Didn't like it's OD channel but maybe the right OD pedal in front of it's clean channel would do the trick...

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by DunedinDragon View Post
                    I surprised a bit by the lack of modeling amps being used here. Maybe it's just our style of worship music, but it's pretty diverse. I use a Line 6 Spider 75 and typically use about 9 or 10 different amp presets to cover all of our material. I try very hard to align my sound with the style of song we're playing, and I can't imagine doing that with a non-modeling amp. I'm not a big fan of a song by Blind Boys of Alabama sounding like a Darrell Mansfield song.
                    I used to be a Line 6 user, but now use the typical pedalboard to amp setup. I find that emulating the sounds of the different bands and styles that we cover as worship musicians usually has more to do with playing technique and approach than it does with trying to mimic a particular guitar tone exactly. I've found that variations in pickup selection and working with pedal settings (overdrive/delay/reverb) can pretty much cover any style I need.

                    I also think having drastically different guitar tones between songs can make a set sound somewhat disjointed/dis-unified as a whole.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by waitin4winter View Post
                      I used to be a Line 6 user, but now use the typical pedalboard to amp setup. I find that emulating the sounds of the different bands and styles that we cover as worship musicians usually has more to do with playing technique and approach than it does with trying to mimic a particular guitar tone exactly. I've found that variations in pickup selection and working with pedal settings (overdrive/delay/reverb) can pretty much cover any style I need.

                      I also think having drastically different guitar tones between songs can make a set sound somewhat disjointed/dis-unified as a whole.
                      As I said, I think it might be more of a function of how diverse your material is. We tend to have a fairly different crowd at our church (a biker church) so the range of material is probably more diverse than most going from delta blues with banjo and dobro (Darrell Mansfield & Glen Kaiser, Crooked Still, Govt Mule), to heavier styles (Seventh Day Slumber, Kutless), and more conventional styles (Casting Crowns, Kathy Triccoli), and even more traditional gospel (Elvis Presley, Blind Boys of Alabama). And although I'd agree you can achieve a lot with pedals, technique and such, a fender tweed will always have a different basic sound than a marshall. It's just simpler for me given the range of material to start with the right amp style and build on it.

                      I guess our congregation doesn't suffer from the aforementioned style "whiplash... probably because they've already experienced so many head injuries from riding bikes their whole lives
                      Last edited by DunedinDragon; 06-08-2013, 02:13 PM.
                      The Posse Band live performance tracks can be heard by CLICKING HERE

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by DunedinDragon View Post
                        As I said, I think it's a function of diverse your material is. We tend to have a fairly different crowd at our church (a biker church) so the range of material is probably more diverse than most going from delta blues with banjo and dobro (Darrell Mansfield & Glen Kaiser, Crooked Still, Govt Mule), to heavier styles (Seventh Day Slumber, Kutless), and more conventional styles (Casting Crowns, Kathy Triccoli). And although I'd agree you can achieve a lot with pedals, technique and such, a fender tweed will always have a different basic sound than a marshall. It's just simpler for me given the range of material to start with the right amp style and build on it.

                        I guess our congregation doesn't suffer from the aforementioned style "whiplash"...probably because they've already experienced so many head injuries from riding bikes their whole lives
                        I respectfully beg to differ on your point about diversity. Outside of church, I play in various bands that cover a variety of styles. My fender tube amp + pedalboard holds up great in any of those situations (yes, even metal) So I do believe that even a simple non-modeling setup can cover many genres and do it well, and that it's not necessary (for me at least) to try to emulate every other artist's amp tone.

                        I hear ya though and I'm not trying to say in the least that there's anything wrong with your approach. I was just offering my own personal opinion and preference. I will concede that my church doesn't do banjo and dobro haha

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X