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Making the Jump from Acoustic to Electric

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  • #16
    I'd simply say to be prepared for a totally different animal. The basic mechanics of how you play are all the same, but the implementation is usually vastly different. Having to deal with a more complex gain structure (in general) is tough for folks to get a handle on.

    I guess just expect to learn how to play differently. You are interacting with a different set of tools that do a different job.

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    • #17
      i think it's easier to go from electric to acoustic than acoustic to electric. My experience is with electric starting with a good amp makes a world of difference.
      Live Blessed!

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      • #18
        I find that I use bar chords and power chords more than open chords on the electric. I think that's probably because I can then use my left hand to mute, and using full chords on crunch/distortion can sounds pretty shocking, so the power chords work better there.

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        • #19
          The droning sound of an open chord through an overdriven amp can sound quite beautiful. The percussive chop of power chords really drives the progression along, but a lot of the time you'll need obscure rhythm to go along with the other instruments. A way to acheive this is to play two or three string chord voicings. This produces pretty decent rhythms without stomping on other musicians and singers.
          Last edited by Edwin; 12-22-2010, 05:18 AM.

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          • #20
            Chords have not been my problem. Yea, there's a lot more up-the-neck type chords in electric than in acoustic, but the chords came quickly to me. The problem has been the lead stuff up-the-neck. The Church team expects lead work from the electric guitar. Not so much from acoustic. I've not done much lead work up the neck on the acoustic, so it's pretty new to me. On the acoustic, I really only needed to learn scales on the first 5-6 frets, or so. Gotta learn scales all over the neck with the electric. Like in the opening of Tomlin's "Made To Worship". Never did stuff like that on acoustic. On the electric, gotta learn it note-for-note perfect.

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            • #21
              There is always the pentatonic scale that slides up an down the neck like barre chords. I played in secular bands before and only used the penatonic scale completely bypassing the major and minor scales. The bass player on the worship team is obsessed with learning scales but he mostly uses the penatonic scale. It's simple and easy to use. Rhythm on an electric is a different story.
              Last edited by Edwin; 12-23-2010, 07:49 PM.

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              • #22
                Yea, the pentatonic scale is real useful. I do use that a lot on acoustic. I also add the "blue" notes on occasion. However, on acoustic, I only need to know the scale in three keys, and capo for the rest. Can't get away with that on electric. And, even using just the one scale, I have to learn it in different positions on the neck. I pretty much have 'em in about three positions. There's three or four more to learn. sheeze!

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                • #23
                  I thought you said you use barre chords. If you do you've noticed a "L" shape pattern for the first, fourth and fifth chords and moving that "L" shaped pattern up or down the neck changes the "KEY" to what ever the first chord is fretted at so transposing "KEYS" is simple. The pentatonic has that same shape thing going on. Just memorize the shape of the scale and it also moves up or down the neck depending on what "KEY" your other musicians are playing. It's easy the first note of the scale names the "KEY".

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