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Making the Jump from Acoustic to Electric

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  • Making the Jump from Acoustic to Electric

    I've been perusing this Instrument Discussion forum and really love the input you all are giving.

    I'm working on training that helps an acoustic player make the jump to electric. What would you say to an acoustic player wanting to switch over to electric? It'd be great to hear what you all have to say about it.

  • #2
    Play less.
    I need pictures of your drummer in his booth/cage/room http://drummersbehindglass.com

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    • #3
      Playing an electric dosen't need a lot of finger or pick pressure so you have to lighten up with your playing. Also you will find you have less control of the volume with your strumming with an electric. I am guessing that it is a lot like the difference between a piano and an organ.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by travisvwright View Post
        Play less.
        that's about 90% of the training summed up in two words.

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        • #5
          I think the biggest thing I work on with my students when they make the switch is muting. Being able to control all the overring of an electric and all the hand noise that becomes noticeable on electric can be pretty frustrating to get a handle on. I have them start with getting control of palm muting first. This helps them with the idea of pickhand muting then we start looking at the fret hand and how to gain control there.
          Blessings, J

          Worship Guitar Now

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          • #6
            You don't use palm muting on an acoustic? I use palm muting shamelessly on acoustic and electric. Open and broken chords sound better on an acoustic in my opinion but even so I will use them on an electric. I have been known to use power chords on my 12 string acoustic. I also use cowboy chords on my Telecaster. I think the biggest difference between the two is the attack and tone.

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            • #7
              Hey Edwin,
              No I definitely use muting on acoustic but it's with a different mindset. I use palm muting in teaching to get the students to be aware of the need to mute on electric and give them the proper tools to be able to do it properly. I give them different exercises to over emphasis the muting and gain solid control of there pick hand. Sorry for the confusion. J

              Worship Guitar Now

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              • #8
                I guess that sounded a little coarse. Sorry I didn't think it through.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by worshipguitarnow.com View Post
                  Hey Edwin,
                  No I definitely use muting on acoustic but it's with a different mindset. I use palm muting in teaching to get the students to be aware of the need to mute on electric and give them the proper tools to be able to do it properly. I give them different exercises to over emphasis the muting and gain solid control of there pick hand. Sorry for the confusion. J

                  Worship Guitar Now


                  I read on another post that you are the guitar instructer at BIOLA. I am humbled. One of the guys on our team just finished his third degree there. I think BIOLA is a great college.

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                  • #10
                    Travis strikes again! beautiful!

                    Smitty
                    Love ONE woman...MANY guitars!

                    www.davidsproblem.wordpress.com

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                    • #11
                      Switching over to an electric guitar means opening yourself up to temptation - of extra gear like amps and effects

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                      • #12
                        Yes it can cause G.A.S.

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                        • #13
                          G.a.s. is an expensive issue .

                          When i teach guitar, acoustic or electric sitting have them do strumming exercises to learn control.

                          I guess one thing i would say is the gain doesn't need to be on 10! the less gain the more expression you get from pick attack.
                          Live Blessed!

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                          • #14
                            Another thing is the function of each in the worship environment. An acoustic will typically drive the rhythm, while an electric is more of a coloring instrument in most cases. Of course, there are exceptions to each case, but the philosophy behind each is different.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by nomad100 View Post
                              I guess one thing i would say is the gain doesn't need to be on 10! the less gain the more expression you get from pick attack.

                              Gain? What's gain? I use the volume control on the guitar as gain so I don't use the master side of the amp where available. I agree that the less breakup you have, the clearer the attack unless you use a compresser.
                              Last edited by Edwin; 10-07-2010, 01:12 AM.

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