!-- Beacon Ads Ad Code -->

Sponsor Ad:

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anyone use aftermarket pickups?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Anyone use aftermarket pickups?

    What kind of aftermarket pickups are you guys using? (if any). I play an Epi Les Paul studio on both pickups and I'm pretty happy with the sound, but I've heard that new pickups can make it sound a whole lot better. Obviously I don't play a whole lot of high gain metal, so I wouldn't necessarily want the most popular pickup out there. Anyone have any suggestions? I've heard good reviews about the Seymour Duncan Hot Rodded.

  • #2
    Anything Duncan is going to be pretty good. I have used them and liked them, as well as EMG (I prefer passive - no battery, as opposed to active pickups) EMG "select" pickups are nice and hot, and don't cost a bundle - a nice upgrade that won't cost you a ton of cash.

    I recently discovered the pickups made by Guitar Fetish, and like them a LOT.

    The upgrades you make will, or course depend on your playing style, and the music you play, but warm is better than cold, and hot is (a lot of the time) better than warm.

    Hope it helps

    Smitty
    Love ONE woman...MANY guitars!

    www.davidsproblem.wordpress.com

    Comment


    • #3
      As with all such things, pickups are a matter of taste. I liked the sound of my stock Epi pickups - but the bridge pickup went microphonic on me and it had to come out. While I was at it, I replaced both. I had a Duncan Pearly Gates laying around and bought a neck-position DiMarzio Virtual PAF used on eBay.

      This is a great combination! All three pickup positions are useful and very toneful. IMO, the Les Paul was born to have PAF type pickups, which these are. I also would not hesitate to put a VPAF in the bridge position at need - love them and run them in another guitar.

      But the stock pickups can sound very good. I know the entire world assumes they have to come out, but don't buy into it. Instead follow your own tastes (and wallet). You can spend a ransom on pickups, so I always remember what it is. I paid $250 for my Epi LP Standard not long ago - it's a great guitar, but it is what it is - a very nice but low-end instrument. So I'm not willing to dump much cash into this one when it's like my number four guitar.

      Greg

      Comment


      • #4
        I have an Epi LP Ultra and i like the sound it gets with the stock pickups (fairly well at least). I've been blown away though, by the warm sound of Gibson P90 pickups! The have the warmest tone I've ever heard. I would at least recommend to everyone to at least check out a guitar with P90s in it and give them a test drive.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a hankering for a P90 guitar too, maybe an EPI goldtop or one of the PRS SEs. It's the one thing I don't have. The most recent Eagles DVD - that guitar player has several P90 guitars (mostly Ernie Ball/Music Man) that sound amazing. They have a very special quality.

          My stock Epi pickups also sounded good, but the bridge pickup went real microphonic. I would not have swapped them otherwise, though I admit the replacements sound far better.

          Greg

          Comment


          • #6
            I just bought and restored for uber cheap a vintage Epiphone Casino. It's an original '64 manufactured in Michigan and someone had replaced the original with P90's and so I bought some real Gibson P90's for her and the tone is nothing short of incredible. I've never been that great at coming up with a really good tone, but this just [I]has[I] good tone. I actually had someone come up to me after I played a rock show and ask me If I was using an overdrive pedal or if my amp was just overdriving the tubes on an overdrive channel because whatever it was it sounded amazing. I then had to tell him that I wasn't overdriving the tubes at all because it was a solid state amp and I was just using the gain!

            Comment


            • #7
              A couple months late on this one, but, I'm a huge fan of DiMarzio. Currently use Ibanez H-H setup with a PAF Pro neck and Norton (not air norton) bridge. Also use another Ibanez guitar H-S-H with after market H/stock S pups - bought it used with them already installed, so I don't know for certain what they are, but I'd venture a guess they are Dimarzio as well. Most Ibanez guys have a hankering for Dimarzio in the axe

              To echo the previous GFS vote, I use a cheap strat copy with GFS authentic premium overwound staggers (I18 model). Excellent results for single coil needs, but they do NOT cancel hum.

              Check the Dimarzio site for sound clips (remembering, of course, the clips are taken from pro CD's and do not reflect the true sound of the pickup outside the context of that artist's playing style). I've got my ears on a bluesbucker...now I just need the guitar to put it in!

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm a big fan of aftermarket pup's. I find that stock ones, while they may sound good, they don't sound great (unless great ones are factory installed...........rarely). I've only replaced the pup's in a couple of my guitars so far, the others will be done soon. Anyway, One of my AmDlx Strats are loaded with DiMarzio Area 58's in the neck and middle positions, and an Area 61 in the bridge position. Those pup's are simply stunning! My '72 Tele Deluxe RI is loaded with Fralin P-92's; great pup's, authentic P-90 grind but totally silent! My LP has the stock 496R and 500T; those sound great so no need to replace them. I'm thinking about dropping a set of Suhr V60 LP's in my other AmDlx Strat. I've owned those pup's before and have loved them; I think I'll give them another go; or maybe some Lollar's, I don't know yet. Other than the specific DiMarzio's, I'm not a fan of production aftermarket pup's. They sound good, but I find that they don't have the extra bit of "it" that the more boutique pup's have. Just my thoughts...............

                Comment


                • #9
                  i play an american strat that came with custom 54s (they sounded good but were not the sound i was looking for) i replaced them with the texas specials (3 single coil ) they are very hot and bluesy sounding , luv em.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Resurrecting the dead

                    Resurrecting another old thread.

                    I've got an Epi Standard Les Paul loaded with Gibson Burstbuckers. I like them, although the bridge tends to sound a little thin and nasally at times (which is OK for some stuff...I hit the parametric EQ, boost the upper mids and snarl away), but for most songs, I run both pickups full-out and use picking technique to control volume. I like the Burstbuckers (WAY better than stock Epi), but I'd like to eventually try the 490R/496T combo...

                    I used to have a couple of Fender Tele's loaded with GFS pickups from Guitarfetish.com. (Smitty mentioned them above...that Smitty is a good man!!!) They are AWESOME!!! Best value out there in my opinion.

                    I had a stock Mexican tele that I changed the bridge out for a GFS hot lead, and MAN....that guitar sounded incredible. Really incredible.

                    I had another stock Mexican tele that I changed the bridge to a "GFS Fatbody 10k." It has P-Bass sized pole pieces...it sounded amazing clean to slightly gritty, but when I poured on the gain, the thing shrieked and howled like banshee. Terrible. But that guitar also got a new pickguard routed for a humbucker, so I put in a "GFS Vintage Split Fender Style" and man, THAT was a cool pickup. Very warm in the lows and low-mids, very little in highs. If anything, it was too bassy. But for mellow parts, it sounded really really good, and when running both pickups with mid-gain, it sounded really awesome. Low end forever, sparkling highs, smooth mids, and it was REALLY responsive to picking technique (as was the GFS Hot Lead bridge in the other guitar...that's why I fell in love with it).

                    Currently, I've got a G&L Tribute ASAT with stock pickups. Those aren't as hot as the GFS Hot Lead, but they're still plenty hot and they sound really really really good...So good I'll probably just leave them in there. They are the exact same pickups the $1500-$2000 G&L's have, so...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      So, Hoss...friend, brother, mentor...I need your help.

                      I'm picking up a new guitar within the next two weeks...well, new to me. Its a '93 strat in INCREDIBLE condition (Lake Placid blue with a maple neck). It plays like a dream, and the grain in the maple neck just pops! Anyway, I want to hotrod the pickups, but I don't want to change the guitars appearance AT ALL.

                      Please give me some ideas, advice, etc.

                      Smitty
                      Love ONE woman...MANY guitars!

                      www.davidsproblem.wordpress.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Smitty View Post
                        So, Hoss...friend, brother, mentor...I need your help.

                        I'm picking up a new guitar within the next two weeks...well, new to me. Its a '93 strat in INCREDIBLE condition (Lake Placid blue with a maple neck). It plays like a dream, and the grain in the maple neck just pops! Anyway, I want to hotrod the pickups, but I don't want to change the guitars appearance AT ALL.

                        Please give me some ideas, advice, etc.

                        Smitty
                        I adore Lake Placid blue...My first guitar was a strat-style Peavey and for my 16th birthday i had sanded it down and my parents took it to a custom luthier here in Boise and had it painted Lake Placid Blue for me...Beautiful.

                        I believe you can change out the picups but retain the same pickup covers. I'm not much of a strat guy, and it's been a long time since I worked on one, but I installed a GFS Premium Texas Hot bridge in my brother's squier. (He says I did all the pickups, but I think it was only the bridge...it was 2 years ago, so who knows...) But I can tell you that the bridge pickup SCREAMS. It is really hot and sounds great through my dad's old Fender Princeton blackface. The one drawback (and might not be a drawback if you like it) is that it's really bright. Piercing, ice-pick-in-the-ear bright.

                        I've put GFS pickups in 3 different guitars...4 different types of GFS pickups, and each one was high quality and sounded really great. Your very best bet would be to email the guy at Guitarfetish with a description of the style of music you play and the sound you're looking for and go from there. He's a great guy and offers excellent advice. But don't hesitate going with GFS. Good stuff at a GREAT price.

                        Ask him about the pickup covers too...I'm fairly certain you can just swap over your pickup covers onto the new pickups, but best to double check.

                        Let me know what route you end up going. :-)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hossman777 View Post
                          I believe you can change out the picups but retain the same pickup covers. I'm not much of a strat guy, and it's been a long time since I worked on one, but I installed a GFS Premium Texas Hot bridge in my brother's squier. (He says I did all the pickups, but I think it was only the bridge...it was 2 years ago, so who knows...) But I can tell you that the bridge pickup SCREAMS. It is really hot and sounds great through my dad's old Fender Princeton blackface. The one drawback (and might not be a drawback if you like it) is that it's really bright. Piercing, ice-pick-in-the-ear bright.

                          I've put GFS pickups in 3 different guitars...4 different types of GFS pickups, and each one was high quality and sounded really great. Your very best bet would be to email the guy at Guitarfetish with a description of the style of music you play and the sound you're looking for and go from there. He's a great guy and offers excellent advice. But don't hesitate going with GFS. Good stuff at a GREAT price.

                          Ask him about the pickup covers too...I'm fairly certain you can just swap over your pickup covers onto the new pickups, but best to double check.

                          Let me know what route you end up going. :-)
                          I installed a GFS I18 single coil set (not sure they're still in production) in a strat copy about a year ago. Sound great through certain amps, but do get ice-picky through others. They're vintage style, they don't cancel hum in 2 or 4, unless I gots 'em wired wrong, even if I do they ain't gettin' switched! I love the the sound of all 3 p'ups and every position on the switch just the way it is.

                          They have a new hum canceling series out too, an interest for sure.

                          I will say I had to widen the guard slots with sanding to put them in, so putting those p'up bodies in a possibly smaller cover may not be an option.

                          One more plug for Dimarzio, if you can afford them check into Area series p'ups (a la Lincoln Brewster 58/58/61, or newer Paul Gilbert sounds, 67 in all three slots), they along with virtual vintage series, or the HS-3 or YJM (both Malmsteen style, but has great smooth edges when distorted, for any style of playing) can be installed in a strat without changing the face of the guitar.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by musicianinthestates View Post
                            One more plug for Dimarzio, if you can afford them check into Area series p'ups (a la Lincoln Brewster 58/58/61,
                            I personally haven't played through any DiMarzio p'ups, but I REALLY like Lincoln Brewster's strat sound...A lot.

                            I'd be interested to know what kind of p'ups and amp Leeland Mooring from the band Leeland runs...His strat sound is incredible.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Smitty View Post
                              So, Hoss...friend, brother, mentor...I need your help.

                              I'm picking up a new guitar within the next two weeks...well, new to me. Its a '93 strat in INCREDIBLE condition (Lake Placid blue with a maple neck). It plays like a dream, and the grain in the maple neck just pops! Anyway, I want to hotrod the pickups, but I don't want to change the guitars appearance AT ALL.

                              Please give me some ideas, advice, etc.

                              Smitty
                              Hey bro, check out my reply to Hoss. Its for you too. And it'll explain this suggestion:

                              Dimarzio.com

                              don't trust sound samples made by Harry Jacobson, they sound the same no matter what pickup he's demonstrating.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X