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Putting A Band On Stage

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  • Putting A Band On Stage

    For various reasons our Church worship team would like to put the band on staging (to the side of the church). The staging would probably be a wooden topped/metal frame/hollow design to match that in the centre of the church. However our tech team are convinced that the vibrations etc. from the drums in particular will be picked up by the vocalists' mic's and so the project is on hold at the moment. Is this an issue? If so how do people get around it?

    God bless
    John

  • #2
    If the stage is hollow, it will amplify the volume of the base drum to some extent. I would think it really depends on the quality of the construction, size of the sanctuary, acoustics, etc, for how much though. The only thing I think that may affect the vocal mics would be if the drums are placed closer the singers than they were on the original center stage.

    You could always place some acoustic insulation (or even blankets) underneath the stage to cut down on some of that reverbiation from the drums, if you need to. But before anything, I'd really talk with your tech team about the issue. If they really know their stuff and your sanctuary/acoustics, I would seriously consider what they say!

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    • #3
      Another thought is to isolate the drums onto their own platform. Our stage is actually three separate boxes underneath, so the drums sit on their own box. It's not noticeable at all when the band is on the stage - it just looks like one long platform.

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      • #4
        If the issue is the vocalists' microphones are on stands then mikeymo's suggestion would address that. Also, putting some rugs down would help dampen the vibrations to a tolerable level.
        The vocal channels should have their lows rolled off too, right. That would help manage any rumble.
        Can you experiment and do a run through?
        @iamjskinny
        blog

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        • #5
          In short, your tech team is right. Hollow stages are the bane of live performance, especially when it comes to the drums and bass. The low rumble transmits directly through the mic stands into the mics. When I was a touring musician we'd run into this all the time so we'd carry around sound isolation pads and place them under mic stands and other equipment. It didn't look pretty, but it did the job. We had this specific problem in our church until we went to an electronic drum kit, but even with that we use an isolation pad under the drum monitor to ensure the we baffle the sound from the hollow stage.

          In your case if it's new construction I'd suggest putting some sound baffling material in the stage itself to absorb the vibrations.
          The Posse Band live performance tracks can be heard by CLICKING HERE

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jc.winterburn View Post
            For various reasons our Church worship team would like to put the band on staging (to the side of the church). The staging would probably be a wooden topped/metal frame/hollow design to match that in the centre of the church. However our tech team are convinced that the vibrations etc. from the drums in particular will be picked up by the vocalists' mic's and so the project is on hold at the moment. Is this an issue? If so how do people get around it?

            God bless
            John
            For years we had our drums in a sealed cage with a back door (I know it sounds hilarious). About a year ago we took that down and now we just use a plexi-glass shield in from of the drum set. It works well for us, more dynamic, and we don't have any issues with vocal mics, but, we have a distance of at least 10 ft from the drums and the singers' mics. Not sure where we bought it, but here's a pic (about $200-300) http://www.pennzonidisplay.com/drumshields.aspx

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            • #7
              A different mic can make a BIG difference in that case as well. In our case, we had a similiar situation, with the drummer behind a 4' shield. I was the worship leader, and I was literally right in front of the shield, with my mic pointed back to the drums. We bought Electrovoice mics for the situation. I can't remember the model now, as it was over 10 years ago, but they were designed to be used in loud environments. They did the job great. They were around $130 US back then, I believe, so they were affordable...
              Last edited by visionman; 07-19-2013, 10:50 AM.

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