!-- Beacon Ads Ad Code -->

Sponsor Ad:

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Advanced Guitarist YouTube Channels?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Advanced Guitarist YouTube Channels?

    Hi!

    One of my goals in this year is for me to improve my guitar-playing chops. I am an acoustic guitarist, rhythm, no desire to become a lead electric guitarist... but that said, I really admire those musicians who incorporate playing a distinct melody (perhaps the melody of the song itself) while still strumming. Quite advanced stuff.

    I do not have a goal to learn to play those U2-esque riffs that dominate much of today's worship scene. Not my thing. In most cases, I believe that removing such improves upon the song immensely, but that's my own personal opinion.

    When I search YouTube for examples on how to play specific songs, the vast majority of them are the latter type of tutorials, and very little of the former.

    For those who are in the know, what are your favorite advanced guitarist song tutorials, those of which tend to not mimic how the song is produced, but rather how the melody line goes? Thanks!
    Nick Alexander
    Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
    Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
    Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

  • #2
    It's been hard for me at least to find that kind of stuff. The advanced stuff tends to be more general theory.

    It might be a more fruitful way to get there by learning/studying more theory related things like scales and modes and building your own melody line stuff. There seems to be quite a bit of that on the Tube. From what I see of people doing that, they use a lot of tools like inversions, triads, CAGED, that kind of stuff that give them a lot more chord shapes to work with.

    Sometimes the better instructors give you a teaser video or two and have lesson programs you can buy from their site. That might be worthwhile if you find a video series that clicks with you. Many also offer on-line support for questions, etc.

    The main issue I have with a lot of the YouTube videos is they try to gear them towards moderate & lightly lower skill levels. If you do find advanced stuff, quite often it's some dude who flies through something and calls it a 'lesson'. I generally find one good video for every 10 mediocre ones.

    I do not have a goal to learn to play those U2-esque riffs that dominate much of today's worship scene. Not my thing. In most cases, I believe that removing such improves upon the song immensely, but that's my own personal opinion.
    I'm with you on that one. I do it on some songs, but most I don't. If there's some space, I've done volume swells, etc. but try my hardest to avoid that "Joshua Tree" sound. Not that I'm a great guitar player in any sense of the word, but I knew before I even started down this road that I wasn't going to do that...
    If we want to go places we haven't been, we will have to do things we haven't done.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've found YouTube instructional videos to be somewhat hit and miss, but then you get what you pay for I suppose.

      Although I'm a lead guitar player, the biggest issue I've had over the years working with rhythm guitar players is their limited range of skills both in chord variants (diminished, augmented, 7ths, 9ths, suspended, etc.) and limitations in their strumming techniques. Some will focus on learning new chords, but it's really strumming techniques that fill out the sound of a song and blend with the overall sound of the band.

      I've been a subscriber to Next Level Guitar for some time now and they have a wide range of lessons available online as well as DVD products. Their instructors are great and they cover from beginner to advance concepts so it may be something you want to check out. Here's a teaser video from one of their DVD collections on rhythm guitar to get a feel for what they do. Anyway, something worth considering.

      http://www.nextlevelguitar.com/chord_magic_set/
      The Posse Band live performance tracks can be heard by CLICKING HERE

      Comment


      • #4
        Ben Gowell, the guitarist for Paul Baloche, did a video a few years back that helped me a ton. You can find it on leadworship.com. Next level guitar is great too.
        Love ONE woman...MANY guitars!

        www.davidsproblem.wordpress.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Paul baloches stuff is good. I've recently found worship artistry.com they have some stuff on YouTube and also their pay site that is ok. Some lead stuff but a few rhythm posts.

          Comment


          • #6
            You say you don't like U2 riffs and I can respect that. But have you ever asked whether or not doing U2-esque riffs in your worship music might better reach the people God has called you to reach?

            The powers that be who make the programming decisions on Christian radio, as well as general sales numbers and hits on streaming sites for worship music have given strong indicators that there are a LOT of people who find that U2 influence in CCM worship music to be really reaching them. Now, I also hear that today that may be moving either to EMD styled music (Hillsong Young & Free as an example) or to more minimalistic, folky & even bluegrass styles (think Rend Collective or Mumford & Sons).

            I'm not saying I like or dislike any of these styles but IF I find a strong wind moving in a direction different than my preferences, am I not obligated as a servant worship leader to go in THAT direction vs my preferred style?

            Maybe you might want to rethink simply dismissing the U2 thing..... or maybe U2 is so 15 years ago with the passing of Delirious out of the mainstream.... or MAYBE the folks in the church where YOU lead want exactly what you're giving them. But even if THAT is the case, before I say "stay the course", I'd ask, "but what about the folks outside your church's walls?"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by gregrjones View Post
              The powers that be who make the programming decisions on Christian radio, as well as general sales numbers and hits on streaming sites for worship music have given strong indicators that there are a LOT of people who find that U2 influence in CCM worship music to be really reaching them.
              I disagree. The powers that be who make the programming decisions on Christian radio have made it abundantly clear that they are only interested in servicing a fraction of the possible demographic, rather than the church entire. They have a name for the ideal Christian radio listener... "Becky." She is a 30-something soccer-mom, who wants light and uplifting music, nothing too challenging, nothing too solemn.

              My audience, for the most part, falls completely outside of these parameters. They're either too young (youth ministry), or too old (Catholic charismatic renewal), or men's ministry. Becky's in the next room.
              Nick Alexander
              Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
              Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
              Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by NickAlexander View Post
                I disagree. The powers that be who make the programming decisions on Christian radio have made it abundantly clear that they are only interested in servicing a fraction of the possible demographic, rather than the church entire. They have a name for the ideal Christian radio listener... "Becky." She is a 30-something soccer-mom, who wants light and uplifting music, nothing too challenging, nothing too solemn.

                My audience, for the most part, falls completely outside of these parameters. They're either too young (youth ministry), or too old (Catholic charismatic renewal), or men's ministry. Becky's in the next room.
                Well, I've certainly been wrong before.

                I totally agree with you about what you say with K-Love. Do they really use the name "Becky" to describe their target demographic?

                I wasn't speaking so much about K-Love's demographic as I was about some of the artists they play who do worship music. Chris Tomlin, Redman and Crowder I think have fans like Becky but also fans that transcend her. Their music has a lot of U2 influences. But lest K-Love's love of the soccer mom target market is unnecessarily complicating our discussion, Jesus Culture, Hillsong and Bethel seem to have music that is U2-esque as well and they seem to be casting a broad net. Now maybe their net is broad but doesn't reach your audience. You know them better than I....

                My greatest point is that as a worship leader, I'm asking my congregation to abandon their preferences in light of the bigger picture of the success of our church at growing the kingdom. I can't ask that of them unless I'm asking that of myself. So although I prefer prog rock and jazz, I ditch most of that when I serve as a worship leader.

                BTW, more specifically to your original request.... are you looking for Youtubes on chord melody guitar playing? If so, maybe I'll put together such a video in a few days (if you don't mind it not having top notch production with tab graphics and ultra pristine audio quality). I've been waiting for a friend who can help me deliver higher quality before putting together instructional videos, but I have the means to put together some stuff even with my cheapo camera. I've done some videos on modes & harmonics. If that interests you or anyone else, check out http://www.gregjonesmusic.com/youtube.htm

                Blessings!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by gregrjones View Post
                  Do they really use the name "Becky" to describe their target demographic?
                  The term "Becky" has been around for a long while. It's even on wikipedia. This has been discussed in the pages of CCM magazine since the 90s, and I believe Chris Rice even wrote a song dissing "her" (shortly before his stuff stopped playing on CCM on a regular basis...).

                  Now maybe their net is broad but doesn't reach your audience. You know them better than I....
                  I'm actually very familiar with the current worship scene; I have my own opinions of such; it's mixed, but I don't throw out the baby with the bathwater. I think there's some excellent songs out there, and well worthwhile building upon. In fact, I should be getting my next installment of the CCLI Top 2000 list in a day or two...

                  But my audience is not a typical church service. I am an itinerant worship leader, who is brought in to do keynotes, or minister at the different areas listed above. I'm in the northeast, a desert land in terms of CCM-prominence. And I had dropped CCLI a few years ago, and have traded those songs for the freedom I get with public domain worship (albeit with a modern acoustic edge).

                  In a couple of weeks (on St. Patrick's Day, actually), I have been invited to do the music for a church service. Most of the congregants will be significantly older. Considering that this is a crowd that varies from month to month, and that there is no set repertoire, I am making it a point to do songs fitting for the day: a rendition to the melody of "Morning Has Broken" (but with St. Patrick-honoring lyrics), "Be Thou My Vision", and a hymn written by St Patrick himself, but refashioned to fit the melody of "Amazing Grace"--I have to hit the ground running with familiar songs off the bat. (As an aside, we forget that St. Patrick was the Billy Graham of his day).

                  So right now I am learning different variants of Amazing Grace, for starters. I just purchased a PDF tablature of one of the more complicated versions of this song; the challenge is to do it in a singable key, and sing along with the "new" lyrics. I will still need to learn the "Morning Has Broken" and "Be Thou My Vision" advanced chords, and I have a month to get these right.

                  BTW, more specifically to your original request.... are you looking for Youtubes on chord melody guitar playing? If so, maybe I'll put together such a video in a few days (if you don't mind it not having top notch production with tab graphics and ultra pristine audio quality).
                  Kinda. I know the basics. I know how to do the melodies at the top of the strings. I'd like to consider doing the melodies in the middle of the strings, though, while playing alt-chords, up the neck. I'd like to have the guitar ring. If this is something you are adept with, I'd be really grateful, and will gladly point to your site from my blog. Thanks!
                  Nick Alexander
                  Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
                  Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
                  Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by NickAlexander View Post
                    The term "Becky" has been around for a long while. It's even on wikipedia. This has been discussed in the pages of CCM magazine since the 90s, and I believe Chris Rice even wrote a song dissing "her" (shortly before his stuff stopped playing on CCM on a regular basis...).



                    I'm actually very familiar with the current worship scene; I have my own opinions of such; it's mixed, but I don't throw out the baby with the bathwater. I think there's some excellent songs out there, and well worthwhile building upon. In fact, I should be getting my next installment of the CCLI Top 2000 list in a day or two...

                    But my audience is not a typical church service. I am an itinerant worship leader, who is brought in to do keynotes, or minister at the different areas listed above. I'm in the northeast, a desert land in terms of CCM-prominence. And I had dropped CCLI a few years ago, and have traded those songs for the freedom I get with public domain worship (albeit with a modern acoustic edge).

                    In a couple of weeks (on St. Patrick's Day, actually), I have been invited to do the music for a church service. Most of the congregants will be significantly older. Considering that this is a crowd that varies from month to month, and that there is no set repertoire, I am making it a point to do songs fitting for the day: a rendition to the melody of "Morning Has Broken" (but with St. Patrick-honoring lyrics), "Be Thou My Vision", and a hymn written by St Patrick himself, but refashioned to fit the melody of "Amazing Grace"--I have to hit the ground running with familiar songs off the bat. (As an aside, we forget that St. Patrick was the Billy Graham of his day).

                    So right now I am learning different variants of Amazing Grace, for starters. I just purchased a PDF tablature of one of the more complicated versions of this song; the challenge is to do it in a singable key, and sing along with the "new" lyrics. I will still need to learn the "Morning Has Broken" and "Be Thou My Vision" advanced chords, and I have a month to get these right.



                    Kinda. I know the basics. I know how to do the melodies at the top of the strings. I'd like to consider doing the melodies in the middle of the strings, though, while playing alt-chords, up the neck. I'd like to have the guitar ring. If this is something you are adept with, I'd be really grateful, and will gladly point to your site from my blog. Thanks!
                    I might need you to post a link of an example.... chord melody playing almost always (from my limited observations/memory) incorporates the melody on the TOP. If it is in the middle, it risks getting obscured.

                    But it also sounds like you might be interested in open chord concepts (beyond your basic open CAGED chords). These are usually chords that move up the neck but also incorporate open strings. Am I on track?

                    I wish you God's blessings on that St. Patrick's day service!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I saw this one guitarist excel at playing the melody mid neck, 3rd or 4th string, but the top two notes were open.

                      That leads me to believe that the song must've been in the key of E. You can't get away with that easily in other keys.

                      So those chords that allow one to do just that... come to think of it, didn't Paul Baloche teach how to do this in one of his guitar tutorials?
                      Nick Alexander
                      Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
                      Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
                      Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by NickAlexander View Post
                        I saw this one guitarist excel at playing the melody mid neck, 3rd or 4th string, but the top two notes were open.

                        That leads me to believe that the song must've been in the key of E. You can't get away with that easily in other keys.

                        So those chords that allow one to do just that... come to think of it, didn't Paul Baloche teach how to do this in one of his guitar tutorials?
                        Got it. Agnus Dei is an example of a song that can be played this way. There are some open voiced chords that can get you started down this road that I can send to you. You are correct that the key of E is the optimal key in standard tuning without a capo.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I look forward to this! Thanks!
                          Nick Alexander
                          Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
                          Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
                          Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X