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Another recording issue

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  • #16
    A “lyric reprint” license is required by Federal copyright law to compensate the songwriter(s) and publisher(s) for using their product. CCLI is only about collecting royalties for lyric reprints of intellectual property being used in multiple churches. I doubt they would even accept you as a member if your song is only being used at one church.
    CCLI will take anyone who pays the fee. But even they will tell you it's not worth it unless your songs are being used at multiple churches. And really, that means a lot of churches. CCLI doesn't compensate for "use" in church, it compensates for "copies." So if my church want to do a song, I report one projection master and one or two charts. If I reuse everything, I never report it again, no matter how many times we use it.

    Unless your song is commercially successful, most worship songs will not be subject to compensation for live performances due to the religious service exception.

    It's really a cost/benefit thing. By the time you spend a couple of hundred bucks registering with various organizations, you'd have to have thousands of copies sold or hundreds of non-exempt performances to break even. If you think that's going to happen, go for it.

    As Yod pointed out, the "poor man's copyright" is pretty useless. But registering a song with just one agency is sufficient to fix the copyright. So, you pick where you think it will do you the most good.

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    • #17
      BMI doesn't charge anything to join as a songwriter. I think ASCAP is about $30-40 but it seems like they represent songwriters a little better from what I'm told by my friends who are with them.

      But, yea, as Mikey pointed out your chances of making anything are small until you have a major hit. Christian music is usually broadcast on non-profit stations which pay very, very, very little in royalties in the USA; about a tenth of what it might get on a commercial station (per play)

      But I expect foreign markets will continue to grow as the USA loses prominence in the current world scenario, especially Brazil, S Africa, and Europe.
      8-)



      what? me worry?

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      • #18
        Here's a good explanation of how songwriter royalties work. When your eyes stop bleeding, you've got it!

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