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Projecting Music

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  • Projecting Music

    I was wondering how many of you project your songs on a screen for either traditional or contemporary music. Do any of you project the music? I have many in my congregation who read music and say they miss that when we use the projector.

  • #2
    If you put the melody line only, it might work. if you put up four parts plus the words, it probably will be too small to see. And you are correct that the lack of notes is a source of many complaints.
    Tom

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    • #3
      For those who want music you could always copy off a 5.5x8.5 copy of the music for them, if legal. Make them available as people come in. I do that with new songs. Check to make sure your church has a CCLI license and keep track of which songs you copy.

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      • #4
        We do not project on the wall or screen. We use hymnals most the time. We do have a church song book that we made, (with all copyright permissions obtained via CCLI or direct to keep it legal) and it just has the lyrics. I have noticed that while many people do not read music, they do know that the circles that are filled in with black go faster than those that are not filled in. They also know that if circles (notes) go higher up on lines (staff) then the notes are higher. So, in their own mind they have developed a method of reading music. Not having the music in the church song book did hamper them. So, because we did not want to add a bunch of printing expenses I decided that a vocal ensemble would sing the song to the congregation first. This allows the congregation to hear the song and how it goes. Then once the ensemble is done singing it, they return to their seats. Then the whole congregation sings it together. The ensemble people are at their seats and singing out and this allows others around them to hear and match pitches and rhythm.

        One other thing I do is to offer up basic music theory classes to church members and visitors. This has helped to improve the worship in the church and build up our Worship Arts ministry.

        Faith in Christ
        Rich

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        • #5
          Check out this web site for free access to score projections:
          http://www.hymnscoreprojections.com
          Feel free to download or request whatever you like.

          Alex
          ...a man of few words, all carefully chosen (hopefully)

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          • #6
            We use Powerpoint. No we dont post the music with the words. The less clutter on the screen the better. The simplist way seems to be The best way and less confusing.

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            • #7
              We have found that most of the congregation is 'music-illiterate' and doesn't even know how to follow the score, so we don't even project the lyrics from the hymnal. We have hymnals for them to use and we have our choir director sing melody through the house speakers. Our contemporary songs have only lyrics projected, (again...most of them cannot even read lead sheets). Cheers. Brad.

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              • #8
                I think a good solution would be to project the lead sheet format, that's just the melody with words under it and guitar chords above. This will require more than one slide most of the time so your computer operator will have to be on their toes but that should be very do-able.

                J

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                • #9
                  we only project the words in both services, our more traditional (or classic) and in our coffee house (contemporary) service. I personally do have a little trouble singing hymns projected on the screen cause I grew up reading them in the hymnbook, however, if you did not grow up reading the music, then I suppose you would pick up the tune just like you would any other song that only pops up the words, just by listening.

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                  • #10
                    A sticky problem with no single solution

                    Like Joni Mitchell, I've looked at projection from both sides now. Began worship leading when your only source for musical information was the hymnal, so each worship participant had one opened in his/her lap. Not good for participation, sound quality, mutual edification, or anything else. Then we got a computer and projector, and everyone began singing with heads raised toward the screen -- the sound really improved, and we thought we were onto something. I began typesetting words and music for each song we used (along with the requisite CCLI reporting), whereupon we discovered several downsides to projection. First, the sound improved, but worshippers were no more involved with one another than they had been with hymnals -- instead of focusing on the hymnal, they now focused on the screen. Still precious little interaction between/among worshippers. Second, the amount of musical information that you can get on-screen is limited, not just by screen size, but also by ambient light, viewing distance, and other variables. Consequently, people who do read (a more significant number than most worship leaders believe, in my experience) were information-starved -- where is the music that I'm about to sing? It's not on-screen yet! And finally, we discovered that projection was no more a silver bullet solution to our musical challenges than any of the other quick-fixes we had tried. At the end of the day, a church's worship music program is an investment, and pays dividends commensurate with the number and quality of fully invested participants. The churches I grew up in really invested in their musical participation, and it showed. If I had it to do over again, I'd take my investment in computer, screen, projector, and prep time, and put it into a church-wide full-court press to increase participation in music across the board. Don't misunderstand, however -- I love the projector for preaching and teaching, so you need it whether or not you're projecting music.

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                    • #11
                      Here's another one: http://paperlesshymnal.com/

                      Originally posted by TheOldATrain View Post
                      Check out this web site for free access to score projections:
                      http://www.hymnscoreprojections.com
                      Feel free to download or request whatever you like.

                      Alex

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        An imperfect solution...

                        I take the time to create PowerPoint presentations for our songs that include music. Sometimes just the melody line, sometimes all of the parts. I'm attaching an example that is public domain.

                        One thing people comment about is they miss reading all of the other information on the page.

                        For the most part it is a good thing, as my congregation sings much better when they have notes to go with their lyrics.
                        Attached Files

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                        • #13
                          We project the words to all songs. For hymns, we include in the corner the page # where the song can be found in the hymnal.

                          We had that complaint too, so we started including hymn number. I can say that although we do provide it, as I'm leading I never see one person pick up a hymnal. Sometimes complaints are made just to be heard. So my friends, we hear you, and we responded!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JenniferLassiter View Post
                            We project the words to all songs. For hymns, we include in the corner the page # where the song can be found in the hymnal.

                            We had that complaint too, so we started including hymn number. I can say that although we do provide it, as I'm leading I never see one person pick up a hymnal. Sometimes complaints are made just to be heard. So my friends, we hear you, and we responded!
                            Jennifer,
                            I fully agree....some [not all] church folk can be real complainers. Many of your congregants have probably been singing a lot of the traditional hymns for decades.

                            One suggestion. Don't make it a bigger deal than it is. We've found that change is best done with little talk and much action. We have a general feel of what the congregation wants. If we feel trying something new will be met with excitement with most but negative reactions with some the less we talk about it the less of a big deal it becomes....sure...address concerns but don't announce it, explain it, rationalize it etc. Just do it....and keep doing it.....people will become more and more comfortable with it and before you know most are saying why did we do this 10 years ago.

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                            • #15
                              I have created about 250 contemporary song files of lead sheets for the screen at
                              www.projectingpraisemusic.com
                              I have been using these files in several places, and people have expressed MUCH appreciation for them.

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