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Fave 8 7 8 7 8 7?

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  • Fave 8 7 8 7 8 7?

    Hi...

    There's a very interesting hymn that I discovered that was written to say goodbye to the "Alleluia" directly before Lent begins. It was written as 8 7 8 7 8 7.

    What is your favorite alternate melody that uses this format?

    Nick
    Nick Alexander
    Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
    Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
    Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

  • #2
    I'm unfamiliar with hymn format so the first thing that comes to my mind is the notes of a scale?

    Could you explain a bit more?

    Thanks!
    Associate Director of Worship & Media at St. Simons Community Church .He is also the content curator and editor here at The Worship Community.

    Comment


    • #3
      Well, in all fairness, this was posted in the traditional folder, where I hoped someone would be familiar with metrical indexes.

      Open up a traditional hymnal, go to the back, and you will find, among the Biblical indexes, the First Line indexes, the topical indexes, and the authorship indexes... the metrical index. And it is there that you will find many numbers jumbled together, just like I have above.

      The numbers stand for the number of syllables in a line. That's all.

      Sound out the stanza for "Amazing Grace", and you will discover it has eight syllables on line one, six syllables on line two, and then it repeats. This is known as 8 6 D.

      Knowing this allows me to substitute an alternate melody for the words. It allows me also to use the Amazing Grace melody for a song that is also in 8 6 D. (You know all those jokes stemming from singing Amazing Grace to Gilligan's Island or House of New Orleans? Exact. Same. Concept).

      Sound out "ODE TO JOY" (from which "Joyful Joyful We Adore Thee" comes), and you will sound out eight syllables on line one, seven on line two, and then repeats four times more. 8 7 8 7 D.

      So I am asking what are your favorite hymns that have eight syllables on line one, and seven syllables on line two, but have a melody that does this three times.

      I know of two so far: I don't know their actual names, but I know them from their songs: "Angels From the Realms of Glory" and "Christ Is Made the Sure Foundation." But instead of relying on those two standards, I was wondering if anybody here has a favorite that I have overlooked.

      So get thee to thy personal library, and drag out your old, dusty hymnal with the ripped binding. Go to the back, and then come back to me.

      Peace...
      Nick Alexander
      Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
      Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
      Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

      Comment


      • #4
        So get thee to thy personal library, and drag out your old, dusty hymnal with the ripped binding. Go to the back, and then come back to me.
        haha! Thanks my friend!

        I love this forum!
        Associate Director of Worship & Media at St. Simons Community Church .He is also the content curator and editor here at The Worship Community.

        Comment


        • #5
          Old dusty hymnals

          I actually collect hymnals. I will choose one, but you will have to explain to everyone why I've been sitting on the floor by the shelves all day and my throat is hoarse from singing.

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          • #6
            Nick,

            The tune you're thinking of is called "Regent Square".

            If you're looking for more modern hymn tunes, you can check the metrical index on my site psalmsandhymns.com. I've got Indelible Grace and Red Mountain Church hymns indexed there as well as my own hymn tunes.

            Meter | Psalms and Hymns.com

            I count 4 tunes with the meter that you're looking for.

            You could also check out Hymnary.org: a comprehensive index of hymns and hymnals | Hymnary.org and search by meter. That site is run by the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship.

            Comment


            • #7
              If I'm not mistaken (and you can correct me, Nick if I am) then "Tantum Ergo" fits into that meter.

              I know it's in Latin, but I always loved that hymn as a kid. The English translation just never did it for me. (of course, it helps that I studied Latin for two years.. )

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by mikeymo1741 View Post
                If I'm not mistaken (and you can correct me, Nick if I am) then "Tantum Ergo" fits into that meter.

                I know it's in Latin, but I always loved that hymn as a kid. The English translation just never did it for me. (of course, it helps that I studied Latin for two years.. )
                You are correct, and yes, I think I'm going to use this melody.

                For those who are interested, I'm going to be playing for a healing liturgy (lots of charismatic oompahs in there) but the date for this liturgy just so happens to coincide with Fat Tuesday, that is, the day before Lent.

                I have chosen to use "Alleluia Song of Gladness" (which is in 87.87.87), an ancient 11th century hymn to signal the end of the use of the term "Alleluia"--a fasting of this word in our worship--until Easter Sunday (after which, there is an explosion of Alleluia songs).

                I like this approach to worship, regardless as to whether one resides in liturgical/ancient-future circles or not. Of course, CCM radio has no time for such distinctions, which is why, for me, it is increasingly outdated.

                I'm also well aware that the majority of interdenominational and non-liturgical churches do not subscribe to this. For Mikey's sake, I promise to not make such a fuss when I am graciously invited to your shindig next month...

                Nick
                Nick Alexander
                Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
                Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
                Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have chosen to use "Alleluia Song of Gladness" (which is in 87.87.87), an ancient 11th century hymn to signal the end of the use of the term "Alleluia"--a fasting of this word in our worship--until Easter Sunday (after which, there is an explosion of Alleluia songs).
                  Reminds me of another good one, "Alleluia, Sing to Jesus." I think that's in the same meter. (Counting on my fingers now.) Yeah, it is, not counting all the vocal runs our cantor used to make all over the melody.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mikeymo1741 View Post
                    Reminds me of another good one, "Alleluia, Sing to Jesus." I think that's in the same meter. (Counting on my fingers now.) Yeah, it is, not counting all the vocal runs our cantor used to make all over the melody.
                    Alleluia Sing to Jesus would be PERFECT... if it were exactly 8.7.8.7.8.7. Alas, it is not. It is 8.7.8.7.D (which is, repeating four times). For me to make it work (and believe me, I've thought of this approach), I would have to add a fourth line to all four verses. Unfortunately, the song is written in such a manner that it doesn't quite flow easily, lyrically speaking. Even if it was nothing but "Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia God Most High" each go-around.

                    Breaketh my heart...
                    Nick Alexander
                    Host, The Prayer Meeting Podcast
                    Worship that is Contemporary, Traditional, Charismatic, Contemplative, Spontaneous, based on the Church calendar, play it whenever you want.
                    Find out what Nick Alexander can do for your conference, retreat or workshop.

                    Comment

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