!-- Beacon Ads Ad Code -->

Sponsor Ad:

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Maybe a basic question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Maybe a basic question

    But what exactly is considered traditional worship? I would consider my church's Wednesday night service to be traditional. But it is definately not "high-church" or liturgical. It is hymns and older choruses, more southern campmeeting style. What do you consider that?

  • #2
    "Traditional" when referring to worship is a completely subjective term, so asking a bunch of worship leaders from all over the world what they think it means really does the person asking no good.

    Having said that, for our church, anything becomes "traditional" after we've done it more than a few times...things don't stay the same around here for long. Our communion is fairly "traditional"...that's about it.

    I would consider "traditional" worship to be any kind of worship that reminds me of anything I used to do that I don't do now. That could be singing out of a hymnal, a worship "team" consisting of a piano and guitar, a choir with robes, a preacher who uses a pulpit, etc.

    None of those things are bad...and "traditional" in and of itself is not a bad thing.

    Nate
    Practical Worship

    Please Pray For My Wife

    Comment


    • #3
      Nate's right (AGAIN!)

      But...off the top of my head...

      More hymns than choruses...piano and organ...NO drums.

      THAT'S pretty traditional.

      Smitty
      Love ONE woman...MANY guitars!

      www.davidsproblem.wordpress.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Main criteria for the traditional label: It must be boring and full of old people. Just kidding! I'm with Smitty, more hymns, no drums or electric guitars.

        Comment


        • #5
          I would say that most "traditional" services are geared towards and built around the music/worship preferences of generations older than genx. That's obviously a huge generalization, but generally speaking, and I know there are many on here that would not consider themselves in that traditional age range, and there are many who are older than 40 that will never be "traditional" so it's just a range built on PREFERENCE not on chronological age.

          Most of the times traditional manifests through organs/pianos. But in the last decade or so there are many "traditional" worship services that incorporate a full band. Why? Because the term "traditional" is subjective. It's fluid. It's always moving.

          What's not traditional today will soon become traditional tomorrow.

          TO ME: I include a lot of the earlier choruses in that traditional category. What happened in the 60s/70s/80s though contemporary at the time, is no longer contemporary. But again, that's just my own way of looking at things.
          Associate Director of Worship & Media at St. Simons Community Church .He is also the content curator and editor here at The Worship Community.

          Comment


          • #6
            Tradurgical?

            I think to a lot of folks viewpoints, traditional worship is when you're singing out of a hymnal.

            But from my perspective, there are a lot more elements to worship than just music.

            Saying the Lord's prayer together?
            Reading a confession or an affirmation of faith together?
            Reading of prayers together?
            A spoken call to worship or responsorial?
            Lecturn readings of scripture?
            Working from a lectionary?

            These are some elements of traditional worship...

            Comment


            • #7
              And also, just for the record, I LOVE TRADITIONAL worship (in a musical sense).
              Associate Director of Worship & Media at St. Simons Community Church .He is also the content curator and editor here at The Worship Community.

              Comment


              • #8
                For our church a Wednesday set list would include songs like:

                Windows of Heaven are Open
                Keep on the Firing Line
                Power in the Blood
                We Bring the Sacrifice of Praise
                Majesty
                Let there be Glory and Honor and Praises
                My Jesus I Love Thee
                What a Day that Will Be

                The reason this question has come up is because our church has put an ad on some local television stations asking for volunteers to play the piano for us on Wednesday. The ad states that it is a traditional service, but all the replies we've gotten have been from people comfortable with a more liturgical type service and not at all familiar with most of the songs that we sing. My pastor asked me for suggestions to word this better, so that we have responses more tailored to what we are looking for.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by way2tyred View Post


                  Power in the Blood
                  Majesty

                  The reason this question has come up is because our church has put an ad on some local television stations asking for volunteers to play the piano for us on Wednesday. The ad states that it is a traditional service, but all the replies we've gotten have been from people comfortable with a more liturgical type service and not at all familiar with most of the songs that we sing. My pastor asked me for suggestions to word this better, so that we have responses more tailored to what we are looking for.
                  Well, no doubt POWER IN THE BLOOD is a "traditional" worship song. But Majesty is borderline, IMO. True, it appears in the United Methodist Hymnal which was revised in 1989. But it's really a modern worship song when you compare it to "How Great Thou Art." (1953) Majesty was written in 1981. Ron Kenoly sings it to this day, and it's awesome.

                  When I look in the United Methodist Hymnal or especially the CHURCH OF CHRIST hymnal, I see that most of the titles are from the 1800s, like "Rescue The Perishing" or "To God Be The Glory" or "Victory In Jesus" or "In The Garden." In my way of thinking, THAT'S traditional.

                  You ask the people at OUR traditional 8:15 service if they like to sing songs from our hymnal like "Pass It On" (1969) or "Here I Am Lord" (1981) or "Spirit Song" (1979) or "El Shaddai" (1981) and they'll just look at you funny.

                  Sure, those songs are IN the hymnal, but they're "new" songs to the people who grew up in the Methodist faith...

                  Maybe you should you advertise it as "Blended."

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X