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Massive Hybrid Gone Beserk

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  • Massive Hybrid Gone Beserk

    Okay I had dream this morning in the twilight sleep stage (and I am not MLK mind you, and am quite reformed so take it for what it is).

    The service was in an ancient cathedral type church but had media screens and killer PA on a strangely shaped half-modern half-ancient stage and the room wasn't so wet reverb wise that modern couldn't be done. The service opened with a string quartet playing Bach and rolled into a Bach Chorale done perfectly by a traditional choir which flowed right into a massively rocked out delirious song. There were liturgies and deep symbolism and an seamless ebb and flow between ancient and modern (NOT the typical blended feel...each was much more distinct). The preacher wore a liturgical robe and preached from the lectionary....Then I woke up thinking, that would so be my church. Weird.

    On my Sunday's off from NW, I go to an extremely high church service. Why? so i don't get caught in the performance trap of "oh we could try that" or "wow, why did they do that?" I go get lost in God through the liturgy. Tis a beautiful thing.

  • #2
    ya know, I enjoy getting into a liturgical environment as well. I used to lead the 9:00 Contemporary Service over at Wesley UMC, and while I was waiting for everyone to arrive, I'd often sneak over and catch part of the 8:30 traditional service ... it was quite refreshing.

    I've also thoroughly enjoyed some Episcopal services, especially some of those who are more in the "charismatic" type of flow (and yes, there are LOTS of those out there who have embraced a more "charistmatic" viewpoint of the Holy Spirit).

    At an annual prayer/fasting retreat I've attended for more than a dozen years, one of the people who attend is an Episcopal priest, and he serves us Communion (The Eucharist) with the full liturgy, responsive readings, etc. It's incredibly powerful!
    Fred McKinnon, Pianist/Composer/Worship Leader
    blog: www.fredmckinnon.com

    Please check out my piano/instrumental music at:
    www.soundcloud.com/FredMcKinnonMusic
    www.youtube.com/c/FredMcKinnonMusic

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    • #3
      Child of my time.

      I don't know about you guys, but I'm only 26 and I believe that this is one of the reasons I'm so enamored with the more traditional/liturgical. It's interesting. I can see a shift amongst people my age to go back to older hymns. I think that for so long people were so busy fighting the "worship wars", that those who were pushing for contemporary forgot what they were losing, and now their children are reclaiming it. As I go through old hymn books, research litergies, and the like, I feel like I'm "rediscovering" something very valuable that's been lost by the church...at least my church. I think it's very important for Christians to connect with those who've come before us. "Faith of Our Fathers" speaks powerfully of this. I'm slowly incorporating responsive reading, scripted prayers, and such. Do you guys have any good resources you'd recommend?
      Last edited by Mike Darley; 07-17-2007, 08:28 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Stevie Nature View Post
        I'm slowly incorporating responsive reading, scripted prayers, and such. Do you guys have any good resources you'd recommend?
        Check out Robert Webber's work on this very subject. I think one of his later endeavors was Ancient-future Worship which speaks exactly to what you are asking about.

        Also, If you ever have opportunity to attend the Symposium of Worship and the Arts sponsored by the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship, it would be very worthwhile. It's held every January at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, MI.

        MOre info: http://www.calvin.edu/worship/

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        • #5
          I think that you need to find the common ground between the modern and ancient woship methods. I've led worship at a pretty charismatic church for a while and everyone was all about the new "feel-good" type songs. But then I started adding in a few hymns and songs like "Jesus Paid It All" and the intensity of worship changed completely. I'm not saying that the new songs aren't good too, just that for a good diverse service a blend is good too. Ephesians 5:19 says to use Psalms, hymns and spiritual songs. To me this denotes the blend of the older and new genres.

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          • #6
            We should also remember that "liturgy" is a latin word defined as the "service of the people." Regardless of what style your music or service is, you have a liturgy. Even an unplanned, responsive service is liturgical according to a strict understanding of the term.

            Our modern (and post-modern, and post-post-modern) tendency to throw off the shackles of our past and forge ahead into new frontiers is now beginning to show in the less-than-inspiring data that shows the youth of Evangelical churches barely understand the common tenets of our faith. Ancient and traditional hymnody would have helped to combat that slide.

            For more on this, check out Josh McDowell's book: The Last Christian Generation. Also, Chuck Colson's newer book: The Faith.

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            • #7
              I'm curious as to what your definition of the "evangelical church would be and also specifically where your less-than-inspiring data comes from. I'm not trying to debate it, just do some research on it.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Bad2103 View Post
                I'm curious as to what your definition of the "evangelical church would be and also specifically where your less-than-inspiring data comes from. I'm not trying to debate it, just do some research on it.
                The two books I listed have a lot of data, especially McDowell's -- very good information. Also Barna's book "Revolution" is an eye-opener.

                As for what the Evangelical Church could have been, and what it has not become, you will have to read some A.W. Tozer, Francis Schaeffer and Harry Blamires. These men, writing in the mid-20th Century, warned the church of that time that by cozying up to the world they would damage the effectiveness of the church to speak truth into society and culture. What they warned would happen -- did happen. We are now in the repair and rebuild stage.

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