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Types of guitars used on CCM worship

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  • Types of guitars used on CCM worship

    I'm interested in the types of electric guitars used in contemporary worship music and how they contribute to the tone/style.

    I see lots of Telecasters (many times with f-holes), and Gretch Electromatics, and a fair amount of Strats (I'd think I'd see more given Brewster's influence). Of course we see Les Pauls and SGs. What I don't see much of are shred guitars. Some of those guitars are more dated than others. I have a John Petrucci Ernie Ball which to me appears to be more of a modern styling for that type of guitar.

    I find that the hot pickups in that guitar might give me more distortion than I want/need for CCM. I tend to play my Strat the most....

  • #2
    I use a Tele, Strat, Les Paul, and a PRS depending on the songs, but my "go to" guitar is my Tele.

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    • #3
      As a Biker Church we tend to be a bit more aggressive in our music than most, but even then I'm not sure an overly hot guitar would fit that well. On the heavier tunes I use my Les Paul standard with Burstbucker Pro's. Most other stuff I use my Strat with Lace Sensor Hot Gold pickups. On the lighter fare such as "Jesus Lover of My Soul" I'll use my Martin acoustic.
      The Posse Band live performance tracks can be heard by CLICKING HERE

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      • #4
        I have to say my go-to is my Strat. I have a Epiphone LP custom, but it's almost too thick sometimes. It plays some KILLER leads when I run it through a modeler TS808 and a Marshall or JCM amp model on the neck pickup. But Ialso do a lot more background ambiance, and I like the strat for that stuff because I can get more of a chimey/jangly kind of sound. But it can get dirty too. I find it easier with my gear to take the cleaner Strat and dirty it up than to take the LP and try to get more chime out of it.

        I also have a knockoff Nashville Tele with some hot-rodded GFS pickups that sounds killer as well- I just don't like the neck on it as much.

        If I started hearing shred guitar it would make me think of Stryper...
        If we want to go places we haven't been, we will have to do things we haven't done.

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        • #5
          Just found this thread...I am with Mike...I play a Strat...less often, my Squire Tele with custom pups.
          Love ONE woman...MANY guitars!

          www.davidsproblem.wordpress.com

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          • #6
            Hey Smitty-

            Interestingly enough, I did a little horse trading and wound up trading the Les Paul for a PRS SE. I have to say that it's a really good playing and sounding guitar- has the fullness of the humbucker without the mud. I still like the strat for the clean stuff but that PRS is definitely a great sounding guitar for what I do. I play the PRS and the Strat about the same.
            If we want to go places we haven't been, we will have to do things we haven't done.

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            • #7
              PRS SE? Good Guitar! I have several buddies (4 at last count) who play them. I have been thinking about one myself. I love single coil pickups though, and got really lucky with the Squire Tele (GFS Retrotron in the bridge). I bought the guitar new, and customized it, for less than $300.00 Sweet sounding Tele.
              Love ONE woman...MANY guitars!

              www.davidsproblem.wordpress.com

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              • #8
                Here's my newest addition to my guitar arsenal. A Gretsch G5420T. What an amazing guitar!!! I've replaced the tuners with Sperzels, replaced the pickups with TV Jones Classics, and put in treble bleed circuits on the volume pots. This guitar absolutely sings!! And the best part is with it's tone and setup up I can use it instead of my acoustic on many of the finger picked songs to get more of a Chet Atkins tone.

                gretsch guitar -vert.jpg
                The Posse Band live performance tracks can be heard by CLICKING HERE

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                • John@Faith 101
                  John@Faith 101 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Drool. <sorry, as you were>

              • #9
                I dig it. I like the color too. My PRS is a Cherry sunburst with the flame maple top.

                Smitty- See if you can borrow one of your buddies' PRS- I think you'll like it. The big things I like are the scale (a bit wider than a Fender, a bit longer than the LP- great for my sausage fingers) and smaller frets. It plays fast with very low action- and I'm not that good a player yet. And it does have a great tone.
                If we want to go places we haven't been, we will have to do things we haven't done.

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                • #10
                  I have played a couple, and I DO like them! Pretty sure a PRS is in my future. Dude, I have been playing 40 years, and I am nowhere near as good as I want to be. Sweet tone comes from your fingers...and from your heart!
                  Love ONE woman...MANY guitars!

                  www.davidsproblem.wordpress.com

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                  • #11
                    I typically play a strat, however, I just got this one and have only played it once live so far. It's a custom shop strat I was graciously able to get and have customized, and probably the only one I will ever own. My other guitar is a Fender FMT Tele. It has the grit needed for more overdrive or distortion, and the ability to coil-tap when I need a softer sound. I love them both, but I think a good guitar with P90's in it is the best in between guitar you could have. (That's next on the list!) 10898314_10154970620880076_626176676971724021_n.jpg11178298_10155495427365076_8260687626693072614_n.jpg

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                    • #12
                      Very nice! My Strat is a black MIM with a maple neck and fingerboard (ala Eric Clapton's "Blackie") that is about to be graced with GFS "Brighton Rock" pups (may do the whole BHM switching system). My Squire Tele is probably my favorite guitar though. GFS "Nashville" Retrotron HB in the bridge...pickup is hot enough that I use a bit of boost and EQ and I have plenty of drive. I will get some pictures posted.
                      Love ONE woman...MANY guitars!

                      www.davidsproblem.wordpress.com

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        I have an American strat I changed over to Lace Hot Golds. It's an HSH configuration but tapped for single coils in positions 2 and 4. If you've never listened to Lace pickups it's worth taking a look at. I love mine. They have great articulation but I can dirty them up if necessary to give them some crunch and body. Typically if I'm doing something that requires a whole lot of crunch and body I'll just switch over to my Les Paul Standard. The Gretsch with the TV Jones Classics is pretty well reserved for anything needing clean full bodied warmth and clarity. Between the three of them I pretty much feel able to approach whatever style of music I'm dealing with.
                        Attached Files
                        Last edited by DunedinDragon; 05-08-2015, 01:15 PM.
                        The Posse Band live performance tracks can be heard by CLICKING HERE

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                        • #14
                          Sweet gear, Dunedin...what's your signal chain?
                          Love ONE woman...MANY guitars!

                          www.davidsproblem.wordpress.com

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                          • #15
                            Thanks Smitty. Actually it's pretty straightforward. I have a wireless receiver on my pedalboard and three transmitters tuned to that receiver's channel and attached to the straps of each of the guitars. To swap guitars I turn off the transmitter on the one I'm putting down and turn on the transmitter of the new guitar. As long as I only have one transmitter on at a time everything works fine. The receiver on the pedalboard is routed through a volume pedal and just a couple of other effects mounted on the pedalboard before going into the amp. I use a Mustang IV ver. 2 modeling amp so the vast majority of my effects are controlled within the DSP of the amp and turned on and off through a set of separate footswitches. I have a 2 button footswitch that allows me to move up or down through the presets, and a 4 button footswitch that allows me to turn on and off the stomp, modulation, reverb and delay effects assigned for that preset. Although I have XLR outputs on the amp I prefer mic'ing the amp as it captures the actual tone better..then off to the PA it goes. It all takes about 15 minutes to setup and tear down, but it's pretty flexible and is easily adjustable to whatever songs we are doing each week, or in a show.

                            I reserve presets 40 - 49 for whatever presets will be used each Sunday, and when we have an outside event or concert I set up the presets for that setlist starting at preset number 50 and up. So moving from one song to the next even with a change of guitars is just a matter of turning off the transmitter, swap guitars, turn on the transmitter, and cycle the two-button switch up one notch to the next preset. Even with a change of guitars I can be ready for the next song in about 5 or 6 seconds with no unruly noise from plugging/unplugging things.
                            The Posse Band live performance tracks can be heard by CLICKING HERE

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