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"The Stand" lyrics

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  • "The Stand" lyrics

    I was at a conference last weekend, where for the first time I heard the song "The Stand", by Joel Houston (Hillsong Publishing) and liked it... except for a question I have about the lyrics on the verses. It says "You spoke all life into motion, my soul now to stand... (You) carried the cross for my shame, my sin weighed upon Your shoulders, my soul now to stand..."

    That phrase, "My soul now to stand" - what does that mean? And, is that correct English? It seems to me it would make more sense to say "to help me to stand". I would like to teach it to my church but might have to change the lyrics.

    I wondered if any of you are doing this song, and what you have to say on the subject. Thanks.

  • #2
    Before we are saved our soul is unstable from sin. Christ gives our soul the strength to stand in the midst of lifes difficulties. I highly doubt anyone in your church will think twice about it unless you call attention to it. It makes perfect sense in the context of the song.

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    • #3
      I was referring to the grammar...

      Thanks for your reply, Stephen - I was referring to the grammar, rather than what it means spiritually. I have never heard anyone say "God stands my soul"; we usually say "God helps me stand" or "makes my soul stand". In my experience, songwriters occasionally word things awkwardly because something rhymes, even if it's not necessarily correct - and I wonder if that's what happened here. However, he uses the phrase four times in the song, so maybe I'm missing something.

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      • #4
        Hey - "stand" is definitely a verb .. or a noun .. I can see it working grammatically without any issue at all.
        Fred McKinnon, Pianist/Composer/Worship Leader
        blog: www.fredmckinnon.com

        Please check out my piano/instrumental music at:
        www.soundcloud.com/FredMcKinnonMusic
        www.youtube.com/c/FredMcKinnonMusic

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        • #5
          Poetry is different than prose. Poetic license and so on. I'd say use the song.

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          • #6
            I have to say, I asked the same question you did, but I do that with a LOT of Hillsong tunes...the infamous "does that line actually mean anything whatsoever?" deal. Though it doesn't seem terribly distracting in this particular song, it's good that you're asking the question. You want to make sure the songs you're introducing your people are more than just a catchy melody, ya know?

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            • #7
              asking the question

              Yeah, we heard the song at a retreat recently and everyone else (20 or so folks from our church) loved it... I'd like to incorporate it into our worship services but I've been wondering about that line. I think it's part of my job to dig through all the music that's out there and find the best songs for our congregation. Sometimes in spite of grammatical problems a song really ministers to people. But most of the time I avoid a song if I consider it poorly written.

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              • #8
                That line is grammatically correct, though a tad archaic. You don't see that particular usage very much anymore (you can see similar constructions in many old hymns), but it is being used to beautiful effect in this song.

                Fantastic song, BTW. It is on my ever-growing list of "Songs I Want To Do At My Church."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by hefdaddy42 View Post
                  That line is grammatically correct, though a tad archaic. You don't see that particular usage very much anymore (you can see similar constructions in many old hymns), but it is being used to beautiful effect in this song.

                  Fantastic song, BTW. It is on my ever-growing list of "Songs I Want To Do At My Church."
                  my issue, personally, isn't 'grammatical' correctness or no - it's that i have a hard time imagining what it means for my soul to 'stand', especially in the context of those lyrics. still a good song, but a pretty odd phrase, indeed.

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                  • #10
                    It may be a poetic license the songwriter is using - a way to express himself and how he is able to "stand" in this life only through God's grace.

                    Or something.

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                    • #11
                      Of all the painfully juvenile songs put out by various worship bands, it's "the Stand" that we're hung up on?

                      I'd toss out a list of better candidates, but I doubt this site has the bandwidth to handle it.

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                      • #12
                        OK...

                        Yeah, I know there are plenty of songs out there with far greater problems... I am one of those sticklers with words. I don't want to lead our people in singing anything that I don't believe to be scripturally (or grammatically - although there are some exceptions to that) accurate. Sorry to come across as such a nitpicker.

                        Thanks, everyone, for your thoughts and input.

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