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Using songs that don't fit lyrically with moment ("Tonight" in morning, for example)

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  • Using songs that don't fit lyrically with moment ("Tonight" in morning, for example)

    The song "Tonight" off the new All Sons & Daughters album is so fun and I'd love to do it, but I'm weirdly conflicted about the way it says "I will rest in your arms tonight" and we'd be singing it in the morning. I could probably do it and no one would be upset... but I'm leaning towards not doing it.

    Why would you write a song that lyrically excludes itself??? Especially if its the hook of the song.

    I am sure there are other examples of this. Where you'd have to make a stretch to fit something. Lyrically or theologically you may make it work, but its kind of tenuous. For example, I used the song "This Joyful Eastertide" in August and explained that we celebrate Easter each Sunday.

    What do you think? Am I over-thinking it?

  • #2
    Originally posted by McNelton View Post
    The song "Tonight" off the new All Sons & Daughters album is so fun and I'd love to do it, but I'm weirdly conflicted about the way it says "I will rest in your arms tonight" and we'd be singing it in the morning. I could probably do it and no one would be upset... but I'm leaning towards not doing it.

    Why would you write a song that lyrically excludes itself??? Especially if its the hook of the song.

    I am sure there are other examples of this. Where you'd have to make a stretch to fit something. Lyrically or theologically you may make it work, but its kind of tenuous. For example, I used the song "This Joyful Eastertide" in August and explained that we celebrate Easter each Sunday.

    What do you think? Am I over-thinking it?
    I'm not familiar with the song you mentioned, but if the line is "I WILL rest in your arms TONIGHT", there is no reason that you can't sing that in the morning. It's future tense. Tonight is in the future in the morning.

    Throughout history, there have been "morning" and "evening" hymns. So there is a tradition, too, of things that work on one end of the day or the other.

    And if you want another Easter hymn to think about: We sing "Christ the Lord is Risen Today" every Easter. Jesus didn't rise "today" on Easter 2014. It was Easter 33 (ish). And we've used that hymn when the sermon was on 1 Corinthians 15 (resurrection) and we were in the fall.

    So, yeah, you're probably over-analyzing.
    Last edited by kepmek; 05-18-2014, 07:03 PM. Reason: Added info on "Christ the Lord is Risen Today"

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    • #3
      you could also use "today" instead of "tonight"

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